Wicked Wednesday: May I and Other Pet Grammar Peeves

Edith here again, writing from a quiet retreat house on Cape Cod. As a child, you might have asked, “Can I go out and play?” Did anyone else have a stickler mom, aunt, teacher, or other grownup who responded, “You can, but you may not until you’ve cleaned your room/finished the dishes/done your homework.” You know the drill. The can/may Strunk and whitedifference is important to some people, or was.

So let’s talk grammar pet peeves on this hump Wednesday. Who has one? Which spoken or written quirks grate like beach sand between your toes when you hear them? Do you distinguish between written and spoken grammar? Opinions on the now somewhat discounted Strunk and White? Dish!

Jessie: I am not really one for pet peeves of any kind. That being said, I am always amazed when people say “I could care less” when what they mean is that she or he “couldn’t care less”. I just cannot understand why that mistake has made its way into the world.

Sherry: This isn’t a peeve, but when I was young one of the ways we learned good grammar was at the dinner table. If I said, “Pass the potatoes please,” my dad would pass them the opposite way from me. There was only four of us so it didn’t take long to get the potatoes but a reminder to say “pass the potatoes to me, please.” I also had a girlfriend who called often for me. She would say, “Is Sherry there?” If my dad answered he’d say, “Yes” and then wait for her to say something further like, “Can I speak to her?” One day she turned the tables on him and after he said, “yes” she said, “thanks” and hung up. It became a running joke for them.

Barb: One of my pet peeves is people who have grammar peeves, as such peeves are often emblematic of the worst sort of snobbishness. Many times the “rules” I see cited with these claims are rooted in some specific form of education, or the eccentricities of someone’s third grade teacher, or are plain wrong. As an example, I was going to say here that whenever someone modifies the word “unique,” it sets my teeth on edge. Unique means the one and only, therefore something cannot be somewhat or very unique. However, in preparing to post, I had a long, interesting read about “absolute adjectives” here. It turns out we modify these words all the time. While it is not logical to modify unique when it means the one and only, it is fine to modify it in its second and more common meaning of unusual or rare. So here I am, hoist on my own petard, and proving my own point about grammar snobs.

Liz: I don’t mean to sound like a grammar snob, Barb, I swear – but when people mess up “your” and “you’re” it makes me CRAZY. Also, random apostrophes. I see it all the time at work – for example, when someone is referring to a group of people by an abbreviation of letters and add apostrophes on even if they aren’t possessing something (AEs, SMAs, etc.) I can’t help it. It’s the journalist in me…

Barb: No worries, Liz. I don’t think the distinction between your and you’re comes from anyone’s third grade teacher’s eccentric view of the English language. I do hate it when my phone, which should know better, “suggests” the wrong word.

Julie: When I was in 9th grade Mrs. Mallow had us write our own grammar books. I think I still have mine. It was a great way to learn the “rules”. I am not a stickler, but I do appreciate knowing the rules so that I can break them. And I can’t end a sentence with a preposition even when it seems natural to do so.

Edith: Oh, good, I was hoping for a rousing discussion. One my little mantras to say after someone complains about an “error” in spoken English is to don my historical linguistics hat and say, “Just another example of language change in progress” – which peevers hate to hear.  Barb, I’ve read long blog posts pointing out how many times Strunk and White violate their own “rules” – in their own book!

That said, we all have things that grate on our ears. For me, one is people not using “an” before a word beginning with a vowel sound. “A apple, a eggplant.” I want to shout, “An apple. An eggplant.” and then I hear myself uttering my own mantra. Nobody knows who and whom any more, but everyone used to. So many people hypercorrect and write or say, “Mark went with George and I” because they think it sounds more proper – when they would NEVER say “George went with I.”

RedInk

Written language, of course, lags way behind spoken in change.Which is why, Sherry, see the your/you’re confusion  in print is so glaring to people like us.

Readers: Grammar pet peeves? Favorite instances of language change in progress?

Memories of Malice 2018

Five of the Wickeds and two of our accomplices attended the 30th Malice Domestic conference last weekend. Malice celebrates the traditional mystery, and we celebrate alongside hundreds of mystery fans and authors (although we sorely missed Liz and Jane joining us). Here are some of our highlights.

Sheila:  Ann Cleeves and Brenda Blethyn. Need I say more? Delightful and talented women who were gracious to the adoring throngs of fans. I asked and was told that “pet” is a term that applies to both men and women and is regularly used by Geordies (those who live in Northumberland, I understand).

Apart from the miles of walking from one end of the convention hotel to the other, everything went smoothly, and I saw many happy faces, and talked to more people than I can count.

Edith: So many highlights!  The core Wickeds started off with dinner together, minus Liz, alas.

WickedsDinner

Jessie and I found our Agatha-nominated books on the special table in the bookstore!

EdithJessieAgathaBooks

The Sisters in Crime breakfast is always a wonderful gathering. Those of us present from the Sprint Club – which Ramona DeFelice Long runs every morning – got a group shot in, too.  The sprints get me writing every morning at seven and I am grateful.

SprintClub

Sprint Leader Ramona DeFelice Long at far right.

The Kensington signing and book giveaway on Saturday was very popular, with an entire box of my books going in under an hour. I had a delightful crew at my banquet table that night, including the Wickeds’ agent, John Talbot, and a bunch of avid fans, plus Map Your Mystery blogger Christine Gentes (standing at far left).

Mybanquettable

Sunday was topped off by a fabulous interview between Catriona McPherson, Toastmaster, and Lori Rader-Day (who could do stand-up comedy if she wished), then the Agatha Tea. But I don’t want to monopolize the blog! Next?

Sherry: One of the highlights for me was introducing Dorothy Cannell and Marcia Adair at the Sisters in Crime Breakfast on Saturday morning. Every year a scholarship is given in Dorothy Cannell’s name to a member of the Guppy chapter of Sisters in Crime so that member can attend Malice Domestic. This year the winner was Marcia. I had a great time getting to know her during the conference. And as I said in my post yesterday it’s just about getting to hang out with members of the crime fiction community be they readers or writers.

Jessie: On Thursday I started out the weekend by spending the day with most of the Sleuths in Time for a plotting and chatting session. They are a fun group of women! Friday evening I had a great time at dinner with the Wickeds own Kim Gray and a host of other friends both old and new.  On Saturday I really loved signing books for some new readers at the Kensington book giveaway! I also had a wonderful time meeting some of the lovely ladies who have already read some of my work at the table I hosted for the Agatha banquet. They were a lively and fun group!

Barb: In the photo below I’m with two members of the Maine Crime Writers, Kathy Lynn Emerson/Kaitlyn Dunnett and Lea Wait/Cornelia Kidd. Bruce Robert Coffin and Maureen Milliken were also there, though I only saw Maureen once, passing in the long hallways.

Kathy Lynn Emerson/Kaitlyn Dunnett, Lea Wait/Cornelia Kidd, Barbara Ross. No, we did not coordinate our outfits!

I had loads of fun on my panel Murder at the Improv, making up a mystery on the fly from audience suggestions with Sheila Connolly, Hank Phillippi Ryan and Parnell Hall.

Murder at the Improv with Barbara Ross, Hank Phillippi Ryan, Sheila Connolly and Parnell Hall.

Julie: I am still exhausted from Malice! Favorite parts? Seeing folks, even in passing.  My panel with Sherry, Shari, and Leslie that Sherry talked about yesterday.  Barb and I hosting a really fun table of folks we didn’t know at the banquet. Seeing Catriona McPherson shine as the toastmaster. Edith and Jessie’s excellent panel (with Rhys Bowen, moderated by Harriet Sackler). Breakfast with Jacki York, who we first met when we carried her on a stick a few Malices back. Seeing Annette and Ramona, the sisters de Felice. Meeting people, as always. But the best part? Laughing. What a great group of folks at Malice. SO much laughing!

Malice going friends, what was your favorite part of the weekend?

Celebrating Five Years of the Wicked Cozy Blog

Thank you, Wicked readers, for being with us for five years! Okay, so maybe you haven’t been with us all five years (here’s a link to our very first blog which, unsurprisingly, didn’t have any comments), but we are so glad you found us and are part of our writing adventures. When we started out we had three published books between us. Since then each of us has had at least one Agatha Award nomination.

This is the very first picture we uploaded to our website. It’s still on our about page.

It’s been so lovely to swap stories with our readers and learn about you through your comments. We’ve had so many fantastic guests along the way. We consider them and all of you, part of our Wicked family. We’ve been lucky enough to meet some of you at conferences, but the rest of you we meet here.

During the first few weeks of the blog we interviewed each other so readers could get to know us. Wickeds, how has your life changed since we first started the blog five years ago?

This is a picture from the Seascape Writers Retreat where so many of us met.

Jessie: How quickly the time has passed! Five years ago I had one book in print through a small regional press. Since then I have published three Sugar Grove books, two Change of Fortune books and one Beryl and Edwina mystery with two more at least on the way. I’ve had my first novel published by a company in Germany, enjoyed the pleasure of having a book released as an audio version and have been nominated for two Agatha awards.

Most importantly, I have come to find my confidence as a writer, to trust my own voice on and off the page and to be more grateful than I ever could say to have been supported in pursuing my dreams by my blog mates as well as all of our readers! Thanks so very much everyone! Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me.

Sherry: When we first started the blog I had just gotten the contract for the first three Sarah Winston Garage Sale mysteries. Now I’m writing the eighth book, then the ninth, and will be starting a new series. I never dreamed I’d be so lucky. I didn’t realize how much publishing a book would change my life. I’ve met and made so many wonderful friends in the writing and reading community. The best part has been doing it with the Wickeds and our accomplices. Each of you bring a unique perspective to life and have enriched mine. Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me. Thank you for celebrating with us!

Here are the first book covers we uploaded:

 

Julie: When we started the blog, I was the only Wicked without a contract. Since then, I’ve signed three contracts for three separate series. More than that, I’ve gotten to know the other Wickeds, and consider each and every one of them a dear friend. As much as I love to celebrate my own successes, there has been such joy celebrating all of their successes as well. I have no doubt that this journey would not be as much fun without Barb, Sherry, Edith, Liz, and Jessie. I also love that Sheila, Kim, and Jane are part of this blog, as are the dozens of guests we’ve hosted over the years. Writing is solitary, being an author requires community. This is one heck of a community, Thank you, dear readers, for being part of it. Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me.

Edith: So many changes! When we started the blog I had one book out – Speaking of Murder, written as Tace Baker, from a small press – and my first Local Foods mystery, A Tine to Live, a Tine to Die was about to release in June. My mom, who taught me through example to love reading mysteries, had died the month before without ever reading one of my novels.

Now? Five books featuring organic farmer Cam Flaherty are out in the world. The second Tace Baker book. Three Quaker Midwife Mysteries, with two (or more) to come. And four Country Store Mysteries, written as Maddie Day, with at least five more in the future! I’ve been nominated for five Agatha Awards, had ten short stories published, and won awards. Mostly, I’ve had the company of these wicked awesome women to keep me company, make me laugh, and provide comfort. And I’ve gotten to know so many devoted mystery readers and fans, on this blog and elsewhere. Thank you for keeping us in business, and for sharing what our stories mean to you. Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me.

Sheila’s first blog post was on July 1, 2013. She’s been on the first Monday of the month ever since. Click here to read her first post.

Liz: When we first started the blog, we were racing to get it launched in time for my first book, Kneading to Die. It’s been such a wild ride since then! In five years, I’ve had six Pawsitively Organic books published, with the seventh coming out this year, and started my new Cat Cafe Mystery Series as Cate Conte. This blog has been a life-changer for me, too – being able to share these experiences with five amazing friends has been one of the high points of this career. And meeting and interacting with all the readers – priceless. Thank you for coming along for the ride with us! Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me.

Our first guest was Connie Archer on June 13, 2013. Click here to read the interview.

Barb: When we first started the blog, Clammed Up, the first book in the Maine Clambake Mystery series, wasn’t out yet. That would come in September. Since then, there have been six books and a novella, with a seventh book, Steamed Open, and a second novella collection, Yule Log Murder coming this year. During the initial period when we started the blog, my granddaughter was born and my mother died, so it has very much been the circle of life for me over the last five years. Click here to read the first Wicked interview with me.

Kim joined us on January 21, 2014. Click here to read her first post.

Jane Haertel joined us on February 6, 2015. Click here to read her first post.

Readers: How has your life changed in past five years?

Welcome Guest Lena Gregory

Welcome, Lena Gregory! Lena is giving away a copy of Clairvoyant and Present Danger to someone who leaves a comment. Here’s a bit about the book:

Whoever said that dead men tell no tales has never met Cass Donnovan…

Cass has always relied on her abilities to guide her, but after communications with a ghost land her in the middle of a murder investigation, she has to wonder if her gifts are really more a curse.

Cass knows she is meant to help track down the killer–much to the chagrin of local law enforcement–when the apparition leads her to a dead body on the beach near her psychic shop, Mystical Musings. But the police are not the only ones who wish Cass would stick to reading palms. Someone is trying to scare her off, and it will take all her powers of premonition to catch the killer before Cass herself becomes the next victim…

Thank you to the Wicked Cozy Authors and Sherry Harris for inviting me to guest blog today. I’m so excited to be here and visit with all of you!

Whether or not ghosts are real is a huge debate in my house. My husband doesn’t believe in anything “otherworldly,” and my daughter and I are firm believers. Have you ever had a brush with the paranormal? And encounter you couldn’t quite explain away, no matter how hard you tried to convince yourself there was a logical explanation? I’ve had several over the years, but I’ll only share a couple.

I have three kids, and not one of them slept through the night, so I can only assume it’s something I did wrong. Of course, neither my husband nor I sleep through the night either, so I guess it’s no surprise.

Anyway, one night, when my middle guy, Nicky, was around a year and a half old, he just would not go to sleep. I was so exhausted I couldn’t keep my eyes open another minute, and I was afraid to bring him in my bed for fear he’d fall down the stairs if he got up and wandered, which he did even then, so I crawled into the crib with him and closed my eyes.

The next think I knew, someone was shaking my shoulder. Startled, I opened my eyes and looked up, fully expecting to find my husband standing over me wondering what in the world was going on, but there was no one there. I was absolutely positive a hand had gripped my shoulder and shaken me, so I sat up and looked around the room, figuring either my husband or my ten-year-old daughter had tried to wake me then walked away when I didn’t respond.

When I looked down, I didn’t see Nicky. Terrified, I jumped up and found him tangled in the blanket. I quickly unwrapped the blanket from his head. His face was beet red, and he was breathing hard but, thankfully, he was okay. It might have ended much differently if something hadn’t nudged me awake that morning. When I finally calmed down enough to get up, my husband and daughter were both still asleep and hadn’t been up to wake me.

To this day, sixteen years later, I still get chills and hug my son whenever that memory surfaces.

On a lighter note, I used to teach dance for a living, until Nicky was about three. I’d always brought my kids to the studio with me while I was teaching, but he couldn’t handle the noise. The kids talking and laughing, the music blasting, tap shoes hitting the wood floor, all proved to be too much for him. He would always want to be in my arms with his hands over his ears.

Within the year, he was diagnosed on the autistic spectrum. He needed physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech, so I gave up teaching and started cleaning houses to give me the flexibility necessary to bring him to therapy five days a week.

One of the houses I took was a beautiful, old house on the bay. The view was gorgeous, as was the house, which was built in the 1800s. One of the first times I went in to clean, I put the garbage pail back in the bathroom beside the shower. Then I realized there was an old stain beneath the pipe under the sink where the pail had been. I figured it must leak sometimes and put the pail back under it. When I returned a few minutes later, the pail was beside the shower again.

That freaked me out a little, but I figured maybe I’d left the floor a little wet and it slid over a couple of feet, or maybe I’d meant to put it under the pipe but then forgot to actually do it. So, I made sure the floor was dry and put it back. The next time I looked in the bathroom, it was back beside the shower. Needless to say, that’s where it stayed that time.

Every time I returned to the house after that day, I put the pail under the pipe and it stayed where it was.

Then, one day, I was in the basement doing laundry when there was a weird sort of scratchy, tapping sound. It was coming from the ceiling rafters in the basement beneath the foyer. It definitely freaked me out, but I finally decided it must be mice or something, and I filed the incident away to use in a book somewhere down the line—which I haven’t yet but still intend to.

When the homeowner asked how everything was going and if I was finding everything okay, I told her everything was fine, but I thought the house was haunted, and I sort of laughed.

She laughed too and asked me what had happened.

I told her about the garbage pail, but not the tapping, since I’d already explained that to myself.

She then told me the house definitely was haunted, and what was now the foyer was originally a bedroom, and someone died in there. She also said they often here a strange knocking sound in the foyer.

The existence of the unexplainable has always fascinated me. Is there truly a world beyond our own that sometimes overlaps with ours? Or are we just creatures with extremely vivid imaginations?

Cass Donovan, from Death at First Sight, Occult and Battery, and Clairvoyant and Present Danger makes a living delving into that world, “contacting” the dead. At least, that’s what her customers think. She thinks she’s just very intuitive. What do you think?

Readers: Have you ever had a brush with the paranormal? For a chance to win a copy of Clairvoyant and Present Danger, leave a comment and let me know!

Bio:

Lena Gregory is the author of the Bay Island Psychic Mystery series, Death at First Sight, Occult and Battery, and Clairvoyant and Present Danger, which take place on a small island between the north and south forks of Long Island, New York, and the All-Day Breakfast Café Mystery series, Scone Cold Killer, Murder Made to Order, and Cold Brew Killing, which are set on the outskirts of Florida’s Ocala National Forest.

Lena Grew up in a small town on the south shore of eastern Long Island, where she still lives with her husband, three kids, and two dogs. When she was growing up, she spent many lazy afternoons on the beach, in the yard, anywhere she could find to curl up with a good book. She loves reading as much now as she did then, but she now enjoys the added pleasure of creating her own stories.

Website: http://www.lenagregory.com/

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Lena.Gregory.Author/?fref=ts

Facebook profile: https://www.facebook.com/lena.gregory.986

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LenaGregory03

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/lenagregoryauth/?etslf=2219&eq=lena%20gregory

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14956514.Lena_Gregory

 

 

What Has Writing Taught the Seven Sinister Sisters?

Edith here, delighted to host the Seven Sinister Sisters, a group I joined up with this winter and spring. We are seven authors with new books coming out, and we’ve been guest blogging all over cyberspace since January. You can see where we’ve been and where we’re still scheduled on our Facebook page. Commenters here today will be entered into our grand giveaway!

Seven Sinister Sisters

For today’s post I asked my sisters this question: What has writing taught you? Here are our answers in no particular order.

Becky Clark: Gosh, where to start? All the obvious ones: work ethic, self-discipline, organization, finish what you start. But also writing has given me a pretty thick skin. Don’t get me wrong, negative reviews always sting, but writing has taught me that everyone has different likes and dislikes. I’m sure I always knew that, but when you mostly hang out with your like-minded husband, kids or kids-in-law, you forget that not everyone has, say, your weird sense of humor, or sees what you were trying to do with your writing. I’ve learned not to take things too personally.

Sue Star: 1. Discipline—I can’t not write.  Even when I’m on vacation I write every day, even if it’s only a paragraph.  2.  Passion—if I don’t feel that burning desire to dig into a project, it’s not worth doing.  Passion is the magic footprint that makes a story sparkle.  3.  Instinct—I’ve learned to trust my instincts about a story. Then “magic” happens, and a story ends up writing itself.  4.  Art—I’ve learned that I can paint, too.  No matter the form, creativity is all about the journey, not necessarily the destination.

Pat Hale: Writing has taught me not to take things personally. In my early days of writing when I received a rejection, it would take days to get over the disappointment and self-doubt. I’ve learned that rejections are not personal and they’re often the best way to learn. After the initial disappointment (still happens, but doesn’t last as long), I remind myself that the editor/agent isn’t rejecting me, but telling me I need to work harder and make my work better. Not personalizing rejection has been a hard learned but excellent lesson that has carried over into every area of my life.

Shawn McGuire: Writing has taught me to be more present in life. I think I notice things more, partly because my writer’s brain is always looking for details, partly because I’m naturally nosey. Part of noticing more means understanding people better. There’s a reason why people are the way they are—whether they’re simply having a bad day or because something happened in their life to make them a curmudgeon. Writing makes me dig down to uncover those reasons. I feel like I’m more understanding of most people, less tolerant of others.

Leslie Karst: That even when a task seems terribly daunting—such as composing an eighty thousand-word manuscript—if you simply keep at it, following through with the process step by step (or page by page), before long you will have finished. Completing the first draft of the manuscript that became my first Sally Solari culinary mystery (Dying for a Taste) was an incredibly powerful confidence builder, both for my writing career and for my life in general. Reaching that goal is all about perseverance and follow-through, and about having a belief in yourself.

Cathy Perkins: The first thing writing taught me was patience! Not just the waiting to hear from agents, editors, and reviewers, but the patience to learn the craft. To not be in a rush to publish before the story is ready for prime time.  Equally important though, writing has shown me how generous the author community is. I’ll never forget how kind and inclusive Sophia Littlefield, Nicole Peeler and Janet Reed were at my first Malice – my first conference and my debut novel. Talk about nervous! They set the bar I’ve tried to reach in helping other authors in this crazy place we call publishing.

Edith Maxwell: For me, being a writer has taught me that I have to show up every morning and write, but also that I have to trust the story enough to let it float sometimes. I’ve learned the value of discipline, and much of writing is in fact hard work. I also now know I can’t control everything. Characters occasionally take their sweet time revealing what comes next or why they acted the way they did.

Readers: What has your occupation, favorite hobby, or pastime taught you?

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Our next stop on the tour is April 3 on the Killer Characters blog. Here’s where you can find each of us in the meantime:

http://www.patriciahale.org

http://www.edithmaxwell.com

http://www.lesliekarstauthor.com/

http://www.cperkinswrites.com

http://www.shawn-mcguire.com

http://www.rebeccawriter.blogspot.com

http://www.BeckyClarkBooks.com

To celebrate our new releases, the Seven Sinister Sisters are having a giveaway!

Seven lucky winners will receive an ebook from one of us.

One GRAND PRIZE winner will receive a signed copy from each of us!

Enter to win by leaving a comment. Our tour runs from January 6th to April 30th and we’re answering a different question at each blog. Leave a comment at every blog for more entries! We’ll draw the winner from the combined comments at the end of our tour.Tour graphic Seven Sinister Sisters

 

 

Kensington Cozies on Sale in March at Barnes and Noble

From March 3 to April 8, Barnes & Noble and Kensington have teamed up to offer a special  promotion–Buy 3 Kensington cozy mysteries and get 1 free!

You can scroll down this page to see the covers of all the offered books. http://sites.kensingtonbooks.com/kensingtoncozies/BN/

But wait, there’s more!

Everyone who buys a Kensington cozy mystery from the B&N in-store display between 3/6/18 – 4/8/17 and registers their purchase at http://sites.kensingtonbooks.com/kensingtoncozies/BN/ will automatically be entered for a chance to win:

  • 1 Grand Prize: Two copies of a new cozy mystery each month for an entire year so you can share the book with a friend.
  • 5 Runners-Up: One surprise cozy mystery ARC.

Note: The same sale is going on at B&N online, though purchases there do not make you eligible for the contest. Here’s the link for the sale. https://www2.barnesandnoble.com/b/select-mystery-novels-buy-3-get-the-4th-free/_/N-2q0o

But wait, there’s even more!

There’s a special end-of-the-aisle display featuring 30 Kensington cozies at every B&N. Wickeds Sherry Harris, Maddie Day (aka Edith Maxwell), and Barbara Ross all have their latest mysteries on the shelf, along with lots of other great books, including mysteries by Friends of the Wickeds, Carol Perry and Lea Wait.

We thought it would be fun for some of the Wickeds to get their photos taken with this special display or with their displayed book.

Sherry: Here I am at my local Barnes and Noble in Fairfax, Virginia! It’s always a thrill to see my books in a bookstore. My husband took the pictures and we only got a few strange looks from the many customers in the store.

Edith: I found the Wickeds’ books (and New England friend of the Wickeds Lea Waits’s, too) top and center at the Barnes & Noble in Peabody, Massachusetts, and convinced a fan browsing the mystery shelves to take my (goofy expression) picture.

Edithatbandn

Here’s Friend of the Wickeds Carol Perry with the display. Carol has three books on the endcap: Grave Errors, It Takes a Coven, and Caught Dead Handed.

Barb: There’s only one B&N in Maine, in Augusta, not in Portland where I was last week. Now I’m back in Key West and there are no B&Ns anywhere on the Keys, so I’m posing below in our backyard with Stowed Away, which is on the display.

We’d also like to give a shout out to our friend, Lea Wait. As Edith said, her book Twisted Threads is on the display. Lea was going to participate in this post with us, but her husband is ill. Anyway, you should buy her book, because it’s terrific. In fact, you should buy 3 and get 1 free!

Readers: Tell us if you spied this end cap in your local B&N, and where it is. We’d love to see a pic of you with the array, too!

2017 Was A Wicked Good Year for the Wickeds

2017wickedreleases (1)Friends, it occurred to us that we hadn’t properly celebrated our 2017 titles. Better late than never! We’re going to list titles and the names we wrote them under here, and will also put it on our site.

How many of these books and stories did you read?

BOOKS

Cat About Town by Cate Conte

When the Grits Hit the Fan by Maddie Day

Murder in an English Village by Jessica Ellicott

Whispers of Warning by Jessica Estevao

A Good Day To Buy by Sherry Harris

A Christmas Peril by J.A. Hennrikus

Chime and Punishment by Julianne Holmes

Called to Justice by Edith Maxwell

Mulch Ado About Murder by Edith Maxwell

Purring Around the Christmas Tree by Liz Mugavero

Iced Under by Barbara Ross

STORIES

“Murder in the Summer Kitchen” by Edith Maxwell, in Murder Among Friends: Mysteries Inspired by the Life and Works of John Greenleaf Whittier (Post Mortem Press)

“The Unfortunate Death of Mrs. Edna Fogg” by Edith Maxwell, in Malice Domestic 12: Mystery Most Historical (Wildside Press)

“An Ominous Silence” by Edith Maxwell, in Snowbound: The Best New England Crime Stories 2017 (Level Best Books)

“Jane Darrowfield, Professional Busybody” by Barbara Ross, in Noir at the Salad Bar (Level Best Books)